Feb 25, 2019 - KKR offers ₹3,100 crore to purchase Siddhartha’s stake in IT firm Mindtree

TradeBriefs Newsletter
View online   Advertise
              from India Software






TradeBriefs Editorial From the Editor's Desk

Nuclear goes retro- with a much greener outlook
Returning to designs abandoned in the 1970s, start-ups are developing a new kind of reactor that promises to be much safer and cleaner than current ones.
Troels Schönfeldt can trace his path to becoming a nuclear energy entrepreneur back to 2009, when he and other young physicists at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen started getting together for an occasional "beer and nuclear" meetup.
The beer was an India pale ale that they brewed themselves in an old, junk-filled lab space in the institute's basement. The "nuclear" part was usually a bull session about their options for fighting two of humanity's biggest problems: global poverty and climate change. "If you want poor countries to become richer," says Schönfeldt, "you need a cheap and abundant power source." But if you want to avoid spewing out enough extra carbon dioxide to fry the planet, you need to provide that power without using coal and gas.
It seemed clear to Schönfeldt and the others that the standard alternatives simply wouldn't be sufficient. Wind and solar power by themselves couldn't offer nearly enough energy, not with billions of poor people trying to join the global middle class. Yet conventional nuclear reactors - which could meet the need, in principle - were massively expensive, potentially dangerous and anathema to much of the public. And if anyone needed a reminder of why, the catastrophic meltdown at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi plant came along to provide it in March 2011.
On the other hand, says Schönfeldt, the worldwide nuclear engineering community was beginning to get fired up about unconventional reactor designs - technologies that had been sidelined 40 or 50 years before, but that might have a lot fewer problems than existing reactors. And the beer-and-nuclear group found that one such design, the molten salt reactor, had a simplicity, elegance and, well, weirdness that especially appealed.

Continued here

Read TradeBriefs every day, to understand the future!

Advertisers of the day
Cambridge Senior Management: Cambridge Senior Management Programme (SMP) | June 2019 | Accepting Applications
Wharton Business Analytics Team: Wharton's Business Analytics Program (Online)

Our advertisers help fund the daily operations of TradeBriefs. We request you to accept our promotional emails.

75% graduates unfit for IT jobs; India needs to bridge employability gap: VC

Nearly 75%of graduates are not fit for jobs in the IT industry today,” said Bangalore North University vice-chancellor during a higher education semin



Today's TradeBriefs Cartoon

Lenovo aims 20 per cent revenue growth in India this fiscal

PC maker Lenovo is looking to increase its India revenues by around 16-20 per cent in the current fiscal, which will be double the industry’s growth rate, a top company official said.Traditional PC sh

’Don’t be too optimistic’: Huawei employees fret at US ban

While Huawei’s founder brushes aside a US ban against his company, the telecom giant’s employees have been less sanguine, confessing fears for their future in online chat rooms. Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfe

Telangana to have India's first blockchain district; woos firms with incentives

Telangana will house all major Blockchain technology companies, a huge incubator and a world-class facility for promoting research.Telangana govt proposed 25% subsidy on lease rentals up to ₹5 lakh per annum for the first 3 years of operations

Electric vehicle journey to begin with hybrid technology in India: Honda

Currently, not many auto companies in India are keen to introduce hybrid models under the GST regime.A hybrid car combines a conventional combustion engine with an electric motor to run the vehicle

US cities hijacked by tool stolen from the NSA

Cyber attacks have reached a new high in US with cybercriminals zeroing in on vulnerable towns and cities.

TradeBriefs Publications are read by over 10,00,000 Industry Executives
About Us  |  Advertise Privacy Policy    

You are receiving this mail because of your subscription with TradeBriefs.
Our mailing address is GF 25/39, West Patel Nagar, New Delhi 110008, India